Divorce is full of difficult emotions. Confrontations. Painful discussions. Disagreeing with your spouse, then reaching the conclusion that your marriage is at an end is likely the most gut-wrenching thing you’ll ever do.

How do you find dignity and respect in the midst of such painful feelings? It may be hard, but it is not impossible. Collaborative Law is a relatively new way of assuring that both you and your spouse emerge intact - personally, financially and emotionally. By signing contracts to stay out of court and at the negotiating table, each party takes the first step toward keeping the decision-making in their own hands. Unlike traditional, litigated divorce, Collaborative Law provides a roundtable of support, which always includes an attorney for each of you, and may also include a neutral financial coach and neutral child life/divorce coach.

This unique blending of emotional, financial and legal coaching produces agreements that are more balanced, more about the future of you as a single person or you and your children as a single parent family. The Collaborative process takes the time to consider the effect of divorce on college funding and retirement. It looks at the life of a child, and helps quarreling parents understand how to co-parent through divorce. It considers disposition of assets, both through divorce and after death.

In other words, Collaborative Law takes the long view.

Collaborative Law does not deny or dissolve lingering feelings about the past, but seeks to neutralize their distracting effect and keep the momentum toward building a new you, a new life, a new family.

Bucks County Collaborative Law Group is not a law firm. It is a professional association in which each member has their own practice. Each member is also uniquely trained in the dynamics of Collaborative Law and the process of negotiation between equals, and a member of the International Academy of Collaborative Professionals. Associate members are professionals in adjunct professions like real estate and mortgage brokerage, who understand that disposition of marital assets, while wrenching, can be handled with discretion and prompt attention to detail.

So you are divorcing. Who do you want to make decisions about your property, your investments and your children. You, or a judge? Collaborative practitioners fervently believe that no one understands a couple or a family’s situation better than themselves. Put yourself back in the driver’s seat and choose a Collaborative Law divorce.


12th annual Pennsylvania Conference for Women

Nov. 19, 2015, 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Multiple speakers including Jessica Alba, Carli Lloyd, Gloria Steinem, Leymah Gbowee, John Jacobs.
Philadelphia Convention Center
Tickets for sessions: $175/person.

Featured Professional:

David A. Emery, CFP®, CDFA™, CCPS

David A. Emery is a Certified Financial Planner™ practitioner and has provided wealth management and...


How it Works

The bottom line of Collaborative Divorce is that both you and your spouse pledge to stay out of court. This is the very core of the process and the key reason it works so well as an alternative to traditional ...


How Collaborative Divorce Benefits You

Divorce is not easy. It can be expensive, time consuming, acrimonious, and unsettling to say the least. With Collaborative Divorce, some of the common stressors of divorce are alleviated through a resolution process designed to preserve the integrity and dignity ...


Frequently Asked Questions

What is Collaborative Divorce? Collaborative Divorce is a new way for couples to go through the divorce process in a more amicable manner, without going to court. Once a couple establishes that Collaborative Divorce is right for them, ...


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